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their work or given back to the environment through culture, through arts and through many of the hard work and we will unveil who will receive this dedication today. as many of you know trees are very important for our communities. they provide us shade, they deter water from going into our storm systems, they provide a place for birds and butterflies and of course they help us clean our air. arbor day is a very important event. it is celebrated not just in america, but all over the world and i'm honored that we are kicking this event. i would like to thank the mayor for bringing arbor day back to san francisco. this is our 8th arbor day. i will welcome mayor lee to the stage. >> thank you the dpw, the recreation department, to all of those who helped us in working today. arbor day, it is an annual celebration that we have struggled very hard to make sure this city appreciate because the trees are part of a great answer and solution to reducing carbon emissions and be sure we have greenery and beautification for our citizens. a lot of my friends celebrated chinese new years in china and th
to save the environment. what is weird is how their saving can be so selective. they're not quacking about a thousand dead ducks showing up in a chinese river, little more than a week after 16,000 just as dead pigs showed up floating in another chinese river. no, a far, far bigger polluter gets a pass, we get a kick in the, well, the gas. to ben stein, charles payne, dagen mcdowell along with charlie what do you think. >> imf, they're bloated, arrogant, more harm to the third world than you can imagine and now trying to do the same to us. by the way, when did they get in charge of the environment? what's going on. they want a trillion dollar tax to save the environment and it's all-- it's regressive, repressive and stupid. and the sad thing is no one says anything, so it might not be a good idea. >> neil: you don't think it's a good idea? >> put me down in the no column. >> neil: what do you think? >> what do you expect out of the imf. anything worse than the local environment bureaucrats are imported ones from europe. and we should point out that most of the environmental bureaucrats rea
the civil war, and in an environment where staff leadership is important for the development of plans for the brigade level, we've got work to do to build a leadership. there has been an increase in the last several months of attrition in the army. the afghans are getting after that. in their view, much of the problem is associated with leadership and the conditions under which troops are living. to their credit, they're working hard to get after those attrition numbers by ferreting out the leaders that need to go, but also closely examining the environment in which the afghan troops are living. i do not have concerns about the afghans fighting. the individual afghan is a brave policeman or soldier. the issue is not that necessarily. andreproduce leadership coherence that capability is that can take advantage of this inherent martial spirit that we find in the afghan individuals and produce coherent fighting units of that. we've got a lot of work to do to build the professionalism of the afghan army. this is a very new army. euphemistically, we're building this airplane while it is in
.40 gas tax to save the environment as protestors are getting ready to once and for all try to put the kabash on the keystone pipeline they say to save the environment. what is weird how they are saving can be so selected, how they aren't quacking a thousand dead ducks showing up in a chinese river after more than 16,000 just as dead pigs showed up floating in another chinese river. far bigger polluter gets a pass, we get a kick in the gas. to ben stein and charles payne and charlie gasparino. >> the imf are arrogant. they have done more harm to third worlds than you can imagine. what did they become in charge of the environment. what the heck is going on. they want to tax a trillion dollar tax to save the environment. it's regressive and stupid. to your point, hey, that might be a bad idea. >> neil: you don't think it's a good idea? >> put me down in the no column. [ laughter ] >> what do you expect out of the imf. sort of local bureaucrats we have in this country are sort of imported ones from europe. had they are 25 times more liberal and most of these environmental bureaucrats
agency that is not even obeying the endangered species act, it is not obeying the environment of national policy act. john: i assumed these people mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal government threatening people of jail time and huge fines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essentially going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cutting down trees before they get old enough to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not good for the woodpecker, not goo
, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to mak
in a marine or water environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned the
is eager to export environment talal ministry is eager to export environment talaly coal exports. he visited a coal powered power plant in tokyo. officials at the electric power development company said the plant boasts the world top level of efficiency. they went onto explain that the level of nitrogen oxide is the same as plants. >> translator: those countries could carbon dioxide emissions significantly. >> he said it should be promoted as one of the country's pillars of growth. american investors have looked into a ground and seen a lot of dollar signs. they hope gas trapped between shell formations will drive the u.s. to energy independence. opponents say extracting it harms the environment. >> reporter: in january, a hearing was held to decide how far shell distraction sites should be from people's homes and wells. and the local people expressed their concerns. >> these rules aren't acceptable because they failed to protect those people who have the 350 foot setback that currently exists. >> reporter: celebrities are also speaking out. yoko ono set up a digital petition that ga
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
economic growth and a cleaner environment. the four he entered public service, secretary paulson held several leadership positions at goldman sachs, including that of chief executive officer. secretary paulson has long advocated the building of a stronger relationship between the united egg and china. while at goldman sachs he established the firm's china presence and encourage elaboration between the two largest economies has been a core purpose of the institute. he has written numerous articles -china relations, on the nation conservatives series asia-pacific council and research on chinese investment in the united states. was named managing editor of fortune in october 2 thousand six if this possibility include overseeing "fortune" magazine and fortune.com with a combined readership of 11 million readers and the digital media and the conferences. under his tenure, "fortune" was ge hot list in 2012. in 2010 it won the society of business editors and writers award for best in business general excellence. that year the magazine also received a new york press award for the 2009 report
obeying the endangered species act, it is not obeying the environment of national policy act. john: i assumed these people mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexisist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal government threatening people of jail time and huge fines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essentially going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shov, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cutting down trees beforthey get old enough to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not good for the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is
growth and depletion of this fragile arid environment may also have been factors. we often think of people like the anasazi as living in harmony with nature. just how common is it that ancient societies overexploit their environment and threaten their own survival ? at the state university of new york at stoney brook, a team of archaeologists seeks answers. elizabeth stone and paul zimansky study the plans of an ancient near-eastern city they recently excavated. woman: so this must be the back wall of the palace. that you can pick up on the photograph there. keach: the city is called mashkan shapir. it was one of scores of ancient cities that thrived 4,000 years ago in the deserts of what is now iraq. this is the realm of ancient mesopotamia. centered around grand palaces and temples, urban life emerged in an area that archaeologists call the first cradle of civilization. today the ruins of these once grand cities crumble in the dry desert earth. but how could civilization have emerged in such an arid environment in the first place ? and what might have caused its destruction ? d
- >> we call it the 3 e's education, environment and enforcement. i don't want to steal others thunder but we try to get the fringes the schools involved we've had 3 meeting with 5 principles in the schools in attendance. we're trying to expand the program to the other districts. we try to get some of the school districts to put some funds or the resources. >> and you may not know the answer to us but have you be able to work with the passenger door enforcement? >> we did an increment trial at the two schools and we were very effective. a letter from the police department rirmentd parents that we were subject to travel enforcement and we had again drop off and pick up are two of the most important times we tend to see some of this behavior and sometimes the parents are part of the problem. as a parents with children in a school i have been impacted on a private and public problem. i've worked somewhat with balboa but on the traffic division. i was assigned to a juvenile department for a while. >> i've been concerned that they have been involved themselves in managing their own traff
information about their subject through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we see why he became a painter. the child's face reveal his own mature vocabulary. for those who have seen the exhibition it's exhibited next to rembrandt's work and you can see the two side by side. from this period, who was most famous for his self portraits. at the time, the paintings, is a copy of the original tradition of rembrandt. here you see the two paintings together which makes a subtle variations evident. the angle of the head and more controlled and refined manner of the brush work and copy on the left suggest that these paintings are probably not by the same hand. we now have scientific evidence which further suggest that the morris picture is a studio copy perhaps by the talented artist gart who is rembrandt'
and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of th
they have to go back to habits that they may have learned. whether from their families or environment they grew up in. i am cognizant of that, having grown up in public housing. and to get better. and to try to do that with the public housing residents now. to give hope to them. no matter where they are, sunnyvale or potrero. but to work with the families and it's not just brick and mortar. i want to give you my personal thoughts of bringing everyone together. it's worth it. it's worth every ounce of our energy to really fill in all the gaps. what makes me the saddest is when diag, and i and police chief suhr get the texts on the mornings where we see a victim of crime. and what i usually do is put a face on that. and i get characteristics. young black male. hispanic male. victim, 2 a.m. gunshot wound, sf general, did not survive. and i try to put my own face on that, which is the kids that i see that we try to graduate up. or middle school kids that i would have seen. what could i have done for them. whether some counseling or guidance. or some support to the family. and we can be ve
call item two. >> item two is authorization for the department of the environment to accept a grant in the amount of $6,500,000 from the california department of. >> >> >> and we have. >> >> >> beof the environment we are here to seek your approval of this resolution which would provide the department with $229,000 from the california department of resources in recycleel for the program and the primary objectives are to make easy and convenient free used motor oil recycling in san francisco and mostly for do it yourselfers and abandoned filters and used oil on the streets and work creatively with collection sites. i have my colleague here to talk about the outreach. it is a program that this department has done and i will ask cynthia to share about the outreach. >> good morning. the grant that we are considering today would primarily -- the funds would primarily focus on district 10 and recruiting certified used motor oil collection centers and increase recycling and grass root outreach to the do it yourselfers and those mechanics so we would like to recruit additional sites an
nature and this is what i love about the city because when it comes to our environment, we do make some serious investments, whether it's green buildings, waste management or going into electric vehicles or getting everybody to change their habits, one of the habits that we want to continue having is planting trees. and so every year for the last 8 years, we have select a signatory to plant and we have taken the liberties of honoring people that have contributed to the quality of life for all of us. in past years, people like rosa parks, caesar chavez, people that we know and are familiar with, along with people that we are not that familiar with but have made some great contributions. today we thought we would take this opportunity to celebrate an icon of san francisco. the brown twin sisters have been with us for many decades. mary is here today, she's here in celebration and memory of her sister as we all are and we want to take this opportunity to use the arbor day to have a cedar tree, a tree that will grow taller than mary or i. it will grow to be a hundred feet tall. it will be
to a new strategic environment. nevertheless, the combination of fiscal pressures and a grid lock political process has led to far more abrupt and deeper reductions that were planned or expected. now dod is grappling with the serious and immediate challenges of sequester, which is forcing us to take as much as a $41 billion cut in this current fiscal year. if it continues, we are projected to reduce spending by another $500 billion over the next decade. the sequestered cut, because it falls heavily on operations and modernization accounts, is already having a destructive and potentially damaging impact on the readiness of the force. the department has already made many cuts, including cuts to official travel and facility maintenance. we have imposed hiring freezes and halted many important but not essential activities. however, we will have to do more. across-the-board reductions aside we are looking at will demand that we furloughs civilian personnel which could affect morale and may impact productivity. cuts will fall heavily on maintenance and training which further erodes the readiness
strong? what does it mean for the markets and your money? in such a low-interest race environment what do you plan with your money? fracking and energy independence. we get into it all with the chairman and ceo of chevron. what may happen to the price of gasoline and oil, next. and helping you find and talk to a doctor when you need one. a different kind of sherpaa can guide you when you need help. >> people call me the doctor of the future. >> "on the money" begins right now. >>> i'm bill griffeth. maria will be along in a few minutes with the rest of the program. first a look at what's making news heading into a new week "on the money." the u.s. economy grew at a slightly faster pace than prevently thought. the final read on the gross poe domestic product, measure of the yoeshall size and strength of the economy rose an an annual pace of 0.4%. better than the previous estimate of just 0.1%. business investments and exports were better than first reported. >>> the markets flirted with new highs during the holiday-shortened week. on tuesday the dow was up triple digits. on thursday, the s
manufacturers are mindful of that and were really designed for the environment. not only fuel efficiency. there's more and more airports right now surrounded by cities. you can't land because of noise? you can't land because of regulations involved commercially defended aircraft become that commanded most environments can sure feel like spirit [inaudible] >> now, but our footprint is four times smaller than the previous peers do you have to wrap your mind around the way that this is going to be in the right business thing to do is a corporation. and then you focus your resources that way. >> what is interesting to note about the emissions reductions at the same time that rpms are supposed to grow double roughly in the next 20 years. so we put rpms growing, will be reducing emissions because of the performance. >> which is a tremendously good record the industry has. >> hard to imagine another industry that's done what we have. >> it's in propulsion aerodynamics and i might say our focus is kind of radical. were looking outside the box design. it's the incorporation of certain other technologies
environments so it is a success that we're proud of. ellen talked about the office of refugee reis thelement and unding -- resettlement and funding. we are actually funded through the u.s. state department and the money comes from our national affiliate organizations. but funding for services after state.mes from the in georgia, it is the department of human services. they have a refugee unit. we also have a state refugee health coordinator in the department of public health. that funding comes from those two programs to provide services like long-term employment services, establish as a second language, some funding for after school, funding for longer term case management, some funding for immigration services. so that's where the state government is involved. the state of georgia doesn't actually provide additional funding for refugee programs. some states do and some don't. the funding passes through the state until georgia. so our state refugee coordinator who is responsible for coordinating that program to make sure services are provided and to hand the contracts and that sort of thing
of cooperation challenges? today to understand that, especially in this fiscal environment. >> the survey telescope would be an important addition to our capabilities, but it's important to understand all these capabilities work in tandem to him. that is they share information. some of the telescopes are better at detection. others are better characterizing the orbit for determining reflect dignity and the likely composition of the object. one always has to think of this as a network. we have telescopes in arizona. they have telescopes in italy. with we've telescopes in the czech republic and they are all linked together and they are all part of a network that provides the overall capability we have to detect these objects. the lsd alone when it comes to fruition would still not be able to enable us to identify and care to raise 90 plus% of the objects in less than a dozen years. but in combination, the orbiting infrared telescope of the kind administrator boldness talking about could lower that time to something in the range of six to eight years. >> the only thing out loud, we flew infr
classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud of the work around the issue of toler
. this is a department of the environment, one of our favorite days. what we support is the climate program. we look at what is our carbon inventory and where is our carbon emission come from. we know it comes from the environment and we are working very diligently to mitigate the carbon sectors. we know that many trees is the answer to reduce the carbon emissions further. in addition it's critical to our adaptation strategy thinking about if we can't ward off, trees will continue to help us with storm waters and they boost property value where they have a robust urban forest. i wanted to mention when i first moved to san francisco, i lived on russian hill, i would sometimes take the cable car and i would often see you and your sister see both of them smiling and the warmth they shared as twins, it brought a smile to my face everyday. as you said before you started your sister is smiling down today and it will live on for both of you, thank you. >> we are going to lower the tree and plant the tree in honor of vivian. miriam i'm so happy that you are here with us today >> i have glad to have seen a
for the environment? >> they are not bad for the environment necessarily. the oyster farm is debatable. the end of the day, the question was, are we going to set this precedent and allow this lease to continue on just because this oyster farm is not necessarily bad for the environment. >> what is interesting, kevin, the owner of the oyster farm is backed by the non-profit group cause of action. that is giving him free legal representation. what do you know about cause of action? >> well, the executive director dan epstein is the former employee of the charles koch foundation. he was the head of the committee that launched a number of investigations on the obama administration. most notably the fast and furious. this whole issue is a darling on the right. it has been on fox news quite a bit and it is making waves. >> what do people who live in the neighborhood by drakes bay and that part of the coast -- it is beautiful -- what do people who live in the region think about the oyster farm? >> the community is deeply divided and has been for a long time. environmentalists are one side. they want th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 612 (some duplicates have been removed)